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Microsoft posts TagReader for iPhone

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Microsoft posts TagReader for iPhone

Redmond (WA) – Following recent release of SeaDragon Mobile for iPhone, Redmond-based software giant has released its second iPhone application – which is also free of charge. Dubbed TagReader, the application lets iPhone owners snap multicolored barcodes
around them to get interactive and personalized business and personal
content directly on their handsets, without having to type anything or
do a web search. Instead, you simply snap a tag with your cellphone to
automatically get things like movie times, videos, music, driving
directions, contact details, retailers’ promotions, product details,
bus directions, social profiles, and many more.


Microsoft Tag is the software maker’s take on barcodes. Basically multicolored mobile barcodes
can be applied to product packaging, advertising, points of sales
and other points of interest. Tags are meant to be snapped by mobile
phone users to retrieve more information. Paired with the accompanying
tag reading software which recognizes shapes and turns them into query
sent to Microsoft’s servers, the technology connects users to related
online information, freeing him from having to type long URLs or texting shortcodes or launch browser.

With TagReader
for iPhone, you can snap a tag using built-in camera on your handset to
get linked interactive content. The application is pretty
straightforward and it gets the job done. You simply center the barcode
(filling about half the screen), tap the button to scan a tag, and, while holding your
hand steady even after the click, press the “Use Photo” button
to get the linked information. Since a camera is required for the operation, TagReader
does not work on iPod touch. Things get really interesting when you
create your own tag that links, for example, to your social profile on
the web, blog entries or your contact details.

To marketers,
tags provide a way to connect their brand in a physical world to
personalized and interactive content on users’ cellphones. For
instance, you can snap a tag of a restaurant in a print or online ad to
get driving directions on your phone. Or, scan a tag on a movie poster
to get trailer on your handset and local movie times. You can even put
tags on your business cards to enable your contacts to easily get to
your online profile and real estate listings and they are popping up in
public places like bus stops where a tag on a route sign connects you
to real-time schedule on your phone or the entire route map.

The
only problem with Microsoft Tag technology is that it’s not yet
wide-spread so you’d have to try really hard to find them around you.
With that in mind, this also limits usefulness ofTagReader on your iPhone, but you can always have fun with snapping a test tag on the Microsoft Tag homepage that should link you to this page on your mobile.